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Brantford Police warn residents about dangers of impaired driving

Brantford Police ServiceBrantford Police warn residents about dangers of impaired driving
Between December 23, 2021, and January 2, 2021, officers with the Brantford Police Service charged seven individuals with impaired driving related offences. 
A summary including the charges, offence date, and location are as follows:
21-50041           12/23/2021        Newcastle Street            
52-year-old male from Brantford charged with Impaired Operation by Drug and Possession of Controlled Substance x 2 
21-50529            12/27/2021        Dunsdon Street
43-year-old female from Brantford charged with Impaired Operation (alcohol)
21-50533           12/27/2021        Dunsdon Street
50-year-old female from Brantford charged with Impaired Operation (alcohol)
21-50550            12/27/2021        Wayne Gretzky Parkway and Colborne Street
25-year-old male from Brantford charged with Careless Driving and Cannabis Readily Available 
21-50640            12/28/2021        403W and Paris Road
51-year-old female from Brantford charged with Impaired Operation (alcohol)
 
21-50830            12/30/2021        Colborne Street
38-year-old female from Brantford charged with Impaired Operation (Drug) and Breach of Probation
21-00233            01/02/2022        Darling Street
19-year-old male from Brantford charged with Failure to Comply with Release Order and Impaired Operation (Alcohol)

Impaired Driving – Not Worth the Risk

At this time the Brantford Police Service feel the need to remind the public of the dangers of impaired driving.
Impaired driving means operating a vehicle (including cars, trucks, boats, snowmobiles and off-road vehicles) while your ability to do so has been compromised to any degree by consuming alcohol, drugs or a combination of the two.
Impaired driving is a very serious offence that endangers the lives and safety of everyone on our roads. 
Alcohol — even one drink — can reduce your ability to react to things that happen suddenly. The effects of alcohol also include blurred or double vision, impaired attention and slowed reflexes. Impaired driving is one of the leading causes of death on Ontario’s roads.
Brantford Police Service would also like to remind drivers that both prescription and non-prescription drugs are an impairment while driving.                                                     

Penalties for Impaired Driving

If police determine that you are driving while impaired by alcohol or any drug, including cannabis, illegal drugs, prescription, and over-the-counter medications, you will face severe penalties as well as potential criminal charges if convicted in court.
The penalties vary depending on the driver’s age, licence type, the amount of alcohol or drugs in your system, and the number of times you have been convicted. 
Impaired drivers will face the following penalties (depending on circumstances): 
• Licence Suspension (3 days to lifetime)
• Vehicle Impoundment (7 days)
• Financial Penalties Payable ($250 to $550)
•Licence Reinstatement Fee ($281) 
• An ignition interlock device may be required (6 months to 10 years)
• Attendance of mandatory education or treatment program(s)
• A mandatory medical evaluation to determine whether you meet the requirements for driving in Ontario
 
If convicted criminally of impaired driving in court, drivers can also face additional fines and jail time.
Throughout Canada, the maximum legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) for fully licensed drivers is to be under 80 milligrams of alcohol in 100 milliliters of blood, or 0.08. Driving with a BAC of 0.08 or over is a criminal offence and the penalties are severe.
In Ontario, you will also face serious consequences if your BAC is between 0.05 and 0.08. This is commonly referred to as the “warn range.”
Drivers aged 21 or under and novice drivers of any age (with G1, G2, M1, or M2 licenses) must not have any presence of alcohol in their blood when behind the wheel. This is commonly referred to as the “zero BAC” or “zero tolerance” rule.
Young and novice drivers are also prohibited from having any presence of cannabis in their system as well as other drugs that can be detected using approved drug screening equipment. Ontario has a zero tolerance approach to both alcohol and drugs for all young and novice drivers.

Don’t Do It – Avoid Driving Impaired

Have a plan to get home safely. Have a designated driver, use public transit, call a friend or family member for a ride, call a taxi or ride share, or stay overnight.
There are simple steps you can take to stay safe and avoid driving while you are impaired by drugs or alcohol:
• Have a plan to get home safely. Have a designated driver, use public transit, call a friend or family member for a ride, call a taxi or ride share, or stay overnight.
• Ask your doctor or pharmacist about side effects related to driving when using prescription medication.
• Read the information on the package of any prescription drugs or over-the-counter medicine, including allergy and cold remedies.
• Ask your doctor or pharmacist about how a prescription drug could affect you. Remember that combining drugs and alcohol together can impair your ability to drive more than using either one alone.
Additional information regarding regulations and penalties of impaired driving is available from the Ministry of Transportation’s website: 

https://www.ontario.ca/page/impaired-driving 

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